Precision Medicine: The Future of Congenital Heart Disease Care?

Every person is different. Every person with CHD is different. So why would you want the same treatment plan for all CHD patients?

Much has been accomplished in the last 10-30 years for the care of patients with congenital heart disease, improving overall outcomes significantly. Most centers, however, still use a one-size-fits-all treatment plan for CHD patients and their families. Every person is different. Every person with CHD is different. So why would you use one treatment plan? Personalized, precision medicine, including using a patient’s own stem cells in their CHD care, could be the answer to the future of congenital heart disease treatment.

In this episode of CHD Wise, we discussed personalized, precision medicine and how it could influence the future of congenital heart disease care with Dr. Joy Lincoln, Director, Cardiovascular Research, The Herma Heart Institute, Children’s Wisconsin; Dr. Michael Mitchell, Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Surgical Director of The Herma Heart Institute, Children’s Wisconsin; Dr. Aoy Tomita-Mitchell, Professor in the division of pediatric cardiothoracic surgery; Children’s Research Institute, Medical College of Wisconsin; Chris Wolfe, CHD patient and parent to two children with CHD; and Stephanie Wolfe, Spouse of CHD patient and parent to two children with CHD.


Resources from our experts:

The Lincoln Lab at Medical College of Wisconsin: https://www.mcw.edu/departments/pediatrics/divisions/pediatric-cardiology/lincoln-lab

The Mitchell Lab at Medical College of Wisconsin: https://www.mcw.edu/departments/surgery/divisions/congenital-heart-surgery/research/mitchell-lab

About our partnership with Herma Heart Institute at Children’s Wisconsin:

This episode of CHD Wise has been made possible through our partnership with The Herma Heart Institute at Children’s Wisconsin.

We’d like to say a special thank you to The Herma Heart Institute and Children’s Wisconsin for your continued support of our education and research programming.

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